AdviceUpgrading Existing ComputerPosted:

rzoppa
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CPU: i7-3770 - 3.4GHz
Motherboard: Pegatron IPMMB-FM Formosa (HP)
PSU: DPS-300AB-73 A (HP)
GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GT 630
RAM: 24GB DDR3
1 - 250 GB Sata SSD
2 - 1 TB Seagate HDD

Looking to upgrade the graphics card to somewhere near a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 with 768 MB VRAM or slightly better. I know that I will have to upgrade my PSU as I currently don't have the means to power a GPU aside from the motherboard.

Looking to work with what I have, willing to spend about $600 as the PSU and GPU's i've been looking at in total would come out to that much. More so looking for feedback if my current hardware is compatible with the proposed GPU/PSU upgrade.

If you need more info I will do my best to answer your questions.
#2. Posted:
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The problem with upgrading office PC's is always the case. So that'll have to be scrapped and a new one purchased to fit new hardware in. But the 600$ you've provided isn't a small amount so we should be able to accommodate this.

I just want to know a bit more about the GPU upgrade. Why is this needed? I just want to know more about what you're planning on doing on this PC then we can priorities the upgrades you need as well as fit more suited hardware into the build rather than buying something that you'll need to change again soon.
#3. Posted:
Forest
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Adam wroteThe problem with upgrading office PC's is always the case. So that'll have to be scrapped and a new one purchased to fit new hardware in. But the 600$ you've provided isn't a small amount so we should be able to accommodate this.

I just want to know a bit more about the GPU upgrade. Why is this needed? I just want to know more about what you're planning on doing on this PC then we can priorities the upgrades you need as well as fit more suited hardware into the build rather than buying something that you'll need to change again soon.
'

This isn't always the case. I've upgraded a lot of friend's computers over the years and they had basic Dell or HP desktops. Motherboards still had a PCI x8 or PCI x16 slot, but the power supply always needed to be upgraded due to missing six/eight pin connectors.


Instead of going with a GeForce GTX 460, lets think of something that is from the last couple years. A 1030 would be leaps and bounds better than the 460, and require a lot less power and cooling capabilities to keep it running. No point in buying hardware that came out almost 10 years ago.


support.hp.com/us-en/document/c03132942 lists your motherboard specs
One PCI Express x16 (Gen 3.0 for i5 and i7 Ivy Bridge processors, all others Gen 2.0)


We at least know what we are dealing with and what we can in thoery install, the other issue is we will need to know how much space is available in the case next to the PCI slot. We may have to go with low profile, or mini card due to case length.
#4. Posted:
rzoppa
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Adam wroteThe problem with upgrading office PC's is always the case. So that'll have to be scrapped and a new one purchased to fit new hardware in. But the 600$ you've provided isn't a small amount so we should be able to accommodate this.

I just want to know a bit more about the GPU upgrade. Why is this needed? I just want to know more about what you're planning on doing on this PC then we can priorities the upgrades you need as well as fit more suited hardware into the build rather than buying something that you'll need to change again soon.


I'm a low level computer gamer but I really appreciate good visuals in gaming. I acquired a computer from work, everything was included except for the SSD, some extra RAM, and the OS that I put into it. I wasn't looking to building a new computer from the ground up for gaming just yet since I was given a free hand out so I'm looking to get the most out of what I have. I probably won't consider building a true gaming computer for another 8-10 years. I started playing FFXIV and the graphics card I listed as an upgrade was what they recommended.
#5. Posted:
rzoppa
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Forest wrote
Adam wroteThe problem with upgrading office PC's is always the case. So that'll have to be scrapped and a new one purchased to fit new hardware in. But the 600$ you've provided isn't a small amount so we should be able to accommodate this.

I just want to know a bit more about the GPU upgrade. Why is this needed? I just want to know more about what you're planning on doing on this PC then we can priorities the upgrades you need as well as fit more suited hardware into the build rather than buying something that you'll need to change again soon.
'

This isn't always the case. I've upgraded a lot of friend's computers over the years and they had basic Dell or HP desktops. Motherboards still had a PCI x8 or PCI x16 slot, but the power supply always needed to be upgraded due to missing six/eight pin connectors.


Instead of going with a GeForce GTX 460, lets think of something that is from the last couple years. A 1030 would be leaps and bounds better than the 460, and require a lot less power and cooling capabilities to keep it running. No point in buying hardware that came out almost 10 years ago.


support.hp.com/us-en/document/c03132942 lists your motherboard specs
One PCI Express x16 (Gen 3.0 for i5 and i7 Ivy Bridge processors, all others Gen 2.0)


We at least know what we are dealing with and what we can in thoery install, the other issue is we will need to know how much space is available in the case next to the PCI slot. We may have to go with low profile, or mini card due to case length.


That's funny you found the exact same webpage I did for my motherboard specs! My starting point on the GPU upgrade was a recommendation for playing Final Fantasy XIV. Im not opposed to going with a more current GPU but I wasn't sure what I was looking at in terms of compatibility. I'd like to get the most out of what I currently have in the box. Everything except for the OS, some RAM and the SSD was given to me for free so I'm willing to throw a bit of money into it if it.
#6. Posted:
Forest
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rzoppa wrote
Forest wrote
Adam wroteThe problem with upgrading office PC's is always the case. So that'll have to be scrapped and a new one purchased to fit new hardware in. But the 600$ you've provided isn't a small amount so we should be able to accommodate this.

I just want to know a bit more about the GPU upgrade. Why is this needed? I just want to know more about what you're planning on doing on this PC then we can priorities the upgrades you need as well as fit more suited hardware into the build rather than buying something that you'll need to change again soon.
'

This isn't always the case. I've upgraded a lot of friend's computers over the years and they had basic Dell or HP desktops. Motherboards still had a PCI x8 or PCI x16 slot, but the power supply always needed to be upgraded due to missing six/eight pin connectors.


Instead of going with a GeForce GTX 460, lets think of something that is from the last couple years. A 1030 would be leaps and bounds better than the 460, and require a lot less power and cooling capabilities to keep it running. No point in buying hardware that came out almost 10 years ago.


support.hp.com/us-en/document/c03132942 lists your motherboard specs
One PCI Express x16 (Gen 3.0 for i5 and i7 Ivy Bridge processors, all others Gen 2.0)


We at least know what we are dealing with and what we can in thoery install, the other issue is we will need to know how much space is available in the case next to the PCI slot. We may have to go with low profile, or mini card due to case length.


That's funny you found the exact same webpage I did for my motherboard specs! My starting point on the GPU upgrade was a recommendation for playing Final Fantasy XIV. Im not opposed to going with a more current GPU but I wasn't sure what I was looking at in terms of compatibility. I'd like to get the most out of what I currently have in the box. Everything except for the OS, some RAM and the SSD was given to me for free so I'm willing to throw a bit of money into it if it.


Depending on the budget, I would recommend a 1650

newegg.com/gigabyte-geforce-gtx-1...6814932287

It's a mini card, so it should fit in most case. I would take a look at your case and try to get an estimate at how much space you have for the card, and if a new case is needed. It's a dual slot card as well, so hopefully your case and motherboard layout supports that.

Benchmarks for old card compared to new gpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Nvi...039vsm7766

I would recommend a new power supply if you are installing a graphics card that gets all power from the pci lane, just since the PSUs that most companies put in the prebuilt computers are trash.

newegg.com/corsair-cx-series-cx55...6817139147

It's a semi modular power supply, which allows you to only use some of the cables you need. It's not a fully modular power supply, as those are slightly more expensive. I would recommend getting a reputable power supply, just because that is the device powering everything in your computer. If that thing is low quality you may have a ticking time bomb that can take out more than just itself when it's time comes.

Total was around $250 for both the GPU and PSU. You could get a better GPU, but it really depends on what resolution and FPS you want to play at. Keep in mind, you are also going to be reaching a CPU bottleneck with the i7-3770. That's an 8 year old CPU, which is still good at some things but with newer processors they are better optimizations for workloads increasing their performance significantly.

anandtech.com/show/14270/the-nvid...at-zotac/9
Has some benchmarks of other graphics cards showing increase in FPS
#7. Posted:
rzoppa
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Forest wrote
rzoppa wrote
Forest wrote
Adam wroteThe problem with upgrading office PC's is always the case. So that'll have to be scrapped and a new one purchased to fit new hardware in. But the 600$ you've provided isn't a small amount so we should be able to accommodate this.

I just want to know a bit more about the GPU upgrade. Why is this needed? I just want to know more about what you're planning on doing on this PC then we can priorities the upgrades you need as well as fit more suited hardware into the build rather than buying something that you'll need to change again soon.
'

This isn't always the case. I've upgraded a lot of friend's computers over the years and they had basic Dell or HP desktops. Motherboards still had a PCI x8 or PCI x16 slot, but the power supply always needed to be upgraded due to missing six/eight pin connectors.


Instead of going with a GeForce GTX 460, lets think of something that is from the last couple years. A 1030 would be leaps and bounds better than the 460, and require a lot less power and cooling capabilities to keep it running. No point in buying hardware that came out almost 10 years ago.


support.hp.com/us-en/document/c03132942 lists your motherboard specs
One PCI Express x16 (Gen 3.0 for i5 and i7 Ivy Bridge processors, all others Gen 2.0)


We at least know what we are dealing with and what we can in thoery install, the other issue is we will need to know how much space is available in the case next to the PCI slot. We may have to go with low profile, or mini card due to case length.


That's funny you found the exact same webpage I did for my motherboard specs! My starting point on the GPU upgrade was a recommendation for playing Final Fantasy XIV. Im not opposed to going with a more current GPU but I wasn't sure what I was looking at in terms of compatibility. I'd like to get the most out of what I currently have in the box. Everything except for the OS, some RAM and the SSD was given to me for free so I'm willing to throw a bit of money into it if it.


Depending on the budget, I would recommend a 1650

newegg.com/gigabyte-geforce-gtx-1...6814932287

It's a mini card, so it should fit in most case. I would take a look at your case and try to get an estimate at how much space you have for the card, and if a new case is needed. It's a dual slot card as well, so hopefully your case and motherboard layout supports that.

Benchmarks for old card compared to new gpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Nvi...039vsm7766

I would recommend a new power supply if you are installing a graphics card that gets all power from the pci lane, just since the PSUs that most companies put in the prebuilt computers are trash.

newegg.com/corsair-cx-series-cx55...6817139147

It's a semi modular power supply, which allows you to only use some of the cables you need. It's not a fully modular power supply, as those are slightly more expensive. I would recommend getting a reputable power supply, just because that is the device powering everything in your computer. If that thing is low quality you may have a ticking time bomb that can take out more than just itself when it's time comes.

Total was around $250 for both the GPU and PSU. You could get a better GPU, but it really depends on what resolution and FPS you want to play at. Keep in mind, you are also going to be reaching a CPU bottleneck with the i7-3770. That's an 8 year old CPU, which is still good at some things but with newer processors they are better optimizations for workloads increasing their performance significantly.

anandtech.com/show/14270/the-nvid...at-zotac/9
Has some benchmarks of other graphics cards showing increase in FPS


In your opinion what would be a good resolution for a desktop setup? I see that the GPU supports up to 8K but would that be overkill if im going to be sitting 3 feet from the monitor? Aside from resolution, and without having a lot of background, im thinking that refresh rate might be important too so that the picture quality is nice and smooth.
#8. Posted:
21
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Luckily, that motherboard isn't some weird proprietary form factor like Dell sometimes use(BTX or whatever).

With the amount of headache you'll have in an old office PC case, I'd just invest in a decent new case to be honest. That said, you might be able to make your current case work, but it might only work with low profile cards. You could cut it up to make more space for a larger GPU potentially, but honestly, new case is just going to save so much hassle IMO.
I've been there before though, I remember having to butcher the inside of an old case to fit an HD7850 inside it lol, and it wasn't even that big of a GPU IIRC.

PSU definitely needs an upgrade. Without a doubt. Technically, you could use your current PSU with the likes of a GTX 1650, but the system is at least 7 years old, and the PSU is absolutely low-end, so I'd feel scared to turn the thing on at this point. Also, vanilla GTX 1650 is a pretty terrible GPU. It costs the same as a GTX 1650 Super, which is a far superior GPU.

Regardless, definitely do not buy a GTX 460. Just forget about that entirely.


So, this is the cheapest half-decent quality PSU that I can find in stock;
amazon.com/BN626-%C2%A1Silencio-F...amp;sr=8-1
You should usually be able to find the likes of the Corsair CX550M for $50ish, which would be a good shout, but stock seems non-existant currently.
Honestly, if it were me and I were buying a new PSU anyway, I'd probably just spend the extra for this;
amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Gold-Ful...amp;sr=8-1
Good quality, gold rated, fully modular PSU that will easily last you several years/upgrades.


Then, GPU, GTX 1650 Super would be my starting point;
- newegg.com/gigabyte-geforce-gtx-1...rj9TfXqmQQ
This one's even a "mini" variant, so should fit in your current case if you want to keep it.
Or a bigger GTX 1650 Super if you're upgrading case anyway;
- newegg.com/gigabyte-geforce-gtx-1...HAbmX_Yvkw
This one's a little nicer looking and will offer better cooling.

If you want a higher end GPU, then a GTX 1660 Super is your next logical step up, you can find 1660 Super's for $230-250 easily. Just get whichever you like the look of best, and is priced appropriately.

You could step up from the 1660 Super to an RTX 2060, which you should be able to find for around $300. So, an RTX 2060 will still be easily manageable with your $600 budget, even with a new case+PSU as well. I most likely wouldn't go much higher end than an RTX 2060 though, in this situation anyway. The RTX 2060 will let you experience RTX + DLSS, if you play any games that support those features- and if you even care about those features.


Lastly, case, this is what I'd start with;
amazon.com/Phanteks-Eclipse-PH-EC...amp;sr=8-1
Great little budget case, really can't go wrong with this IMO.
You could spend a little extra for a P400A, which is just pretty much a slightly larger version of the same case. The P400A also comes in an RGB variant, but that's a $100 case at that point.
pcpartpicker.com/search/?q=p400a
If you buy the P300A, you should add a case fan or 2. If you buy the P400A, it'll be fine as it comes.


rzoppa wrote I see that the GPU supports up to 8K but would that be overkill if im going to be sitting 3 feet from the monitor?

8K would be overkill because the GTX 1650 is an entry level GPU. Also because 8K monitors/TV's barely exist, and those that do, are very expensive.

GTX 1650/1650 Super are 1080p 60/75Hz GPU's. GTX 1660 Super is decent for 1080144Hz or 1440p60Hz. RTX 2060 I'd probably also stick to 1080p144Hz or 1440p60Hz, but you get better performance and some extra features over a 1660 Super.

rzoppa wroteIn your opinion what would be a good resolution for a desktop setup?...im thinking that refresh rate might be important too so that the picture quality is nice and smooth.

Depends entirely on what you're using the system for exactly. Also depends on your budget. Is the $600 overall budget including a new monitor?
#9. Posted:
rzoppa
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21 wroteLuckily, that motherboard isn't some weird proprietary form factor like Dell sometimes use(BTX or whatever).

With the amount of headache you'll have in an old office PC case, I'd just invest in a decent new case to be honest. That said, you might be able to make your current case work, but it might only work with low profile cards. You could cut it up to make more space for a larger GPU potentially, but honestly, new case is just going to save so much hassle IMO.
I've been there before though, I remember having to butcher the inside of an old case to fit an HD7850 inside it lol, and it wasn't even that big of a GPU IIRC.

PSU definitely needs an upgrade. Without a doubt. Technically, you could use your current PSU with the likes of a GTX 1650, but the system is at least 7 years old, and the PSU is absolutely low-end, so I'd feel scared to turn the thing on at this point. Also, vanilla GTX 1650 is a pretty terrible GPU. It costs the same as a GTX 1650 Super, which is a far superior GPU.

Regardless, definitely do not buy a GTX 460. Just forget about that entirely.


So, this is the cheapest half-decent quality PSU that I can find in stock;
amazon.com/BN626-%C2%A1Silencio-F...amp;sr=8-1
You should usually be able to find the likes of the Corsair CX550M for $50ish, which would be a good shout, but stock seems non-existant currently.
Honestly, if it were me and I were buying a new PSU anyway, I'd probably just spend the extra for this;
amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Gold-Ful...amp;sr=8-1
Good quality, gold rated, fully modular PSU that will easily last you several years/upgrades.


Then, GPU, GTX 1650 Super would be my starting point;
- newegg.com/gigabyte-geforce-gtx-1...rj9TfXqmQQ
This one's even a "mini" variant, so should fit in your current case if you want to keep it.
Or a bigger GTX 1650 Super if you're upgrading case anyway;
- newegg.com/gigabyte-geforce-gtx-1...HAbmX_Yvkw
This one's a little nicer looking and will offer better cooling.

If you want a higher end GPU, then a GTX 1660 Super is your next logical step up, you can find 1660 Super's for $230-250 easily. Just get whichever you like the look of best, and is priced appropriately.

You could step up from the 1660 Super to an RTX 2060, which you should be able to find for around $300. So, an RTX 2060 will still be easily manageable with your $600 budget, even with a new case+PSU as well. I most likely wouldn't go much higher end than an RTX 2060 though, in this situation anyway. The RTX 2060 will let you experience RTX + DLSS, if you play any games that support those features- and if you even care about those features.


Lastly, case, this is what I'd start with;
amazon.com/Phanteks-Eclipse-PH-EC...amp;sr=8-1
Great little budget case, really can't go wrong with this IMO.
You could spend a little extra for a P400A, which is just pretty much a slightly larger version of the same case. The P400A also comes in an RGB variant, but that's a $100 case at that point.
pcpartpicker.com/search/?q=p400a
If you buy the P300A, you should add a case fan or 2. If you buy the P400A, it'll be fine as it comes.


rzoppa wrote I see that the GPU supports up to 8K but would that be overkill if im going to be sitting 3 feet from the monitor?

8K would be overkill because the GTX 1650 is an entry level GPU. Also because 8K monitors/TV's barely exist, and those that do, are very expensive.

GTX 1650/1650 Super are 1080p 60/75Hz GPU's. GTX 1660 Super is decent for 1080144Hz or 1440p60Hz. RTX 2060 I'd probably also stick to 1080p144Hz or 1440p60Hz, but you get better performance and some extra features over a 1660 Super.

rzoppa wroteIn your opinion what would be a good resolution for a desktop setup?...im thinking that refresh rate might be important too so that the picture quality is nice and smooth.

Depends entirely on what you're using the system for exactly. Also depends on your budget. Is the $600 overall budget including a new monitor?


Im mostly interested in great visuals. Ideally i'd like to run my games on their highest visual settings. I play Starcraft II and Final Fantasy XIV (recently) and a number of older games. The secondary purpose is a backup work computer to run AutoCAD/Revit programs. The rest of the time its browsing the internet and watching YouTube videos.

It would be nice to have a new case just so I don't have to look at my current setup and think "that was an old work computer" but I would probably stick with $600 for my budget. If the remaining balance after the PSU and case limits my selection on the GPU then I may consider adjusting it.

Come to think of it I need to incorporate a monitor upgrade as well so i'll have to look into that and see what would go well with the GPU.
#10. Posted:
rzoppa
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One thing that I happened to look over was the fan connections on my motherboard. From the specs I have 1 - CPU fan connector, 1 - System fan connector (3 pin), and 1 - Pump fan connector (4 pin)

If I get a case such as the Phanteks P400A which offers plenty of fan options will I be limited due to the number of connections I have to the motherboard?

....

I did some research and found out that I can get cables that can allow me to hook the fans into a 4 pin slot on the PSU.

newegg.com/p/1W7-007D-00027?Descr...-_-Product

Would you recommend I use this product? It seems sensible to connect it to the Pump fan connector since it is a 4 pin, but i'd run it through the Pump connector?
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