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Linux Programming QuestionPosted:

SSID
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Is there a better IDE and Compiler then Eclipse for C/C++/C#/Java. Most importantly C cause thats what im working with mostly now I'm Running Ubuntu, and im just looking for a compiler and IDE that make the experience more simple, and maybe with more options to auto fill things.
#2. Posted:
tortuga
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There's a lot of options out there. If you search for "Linux IDE for whatever-language-you-want" on Google, you'll get a lot of results.

I can only recommend NetBeans and MonoDevelop as those are the only two free IDEs I've used that'll run on Linux. You can also look into the JetBrain's family of IDEs - IntelliJ for Java, CLion for C/C++, and their emerging one Rider (early build) for .NET Core. These IDEs are not free after a trial period unless you can get an educational license from them.

You could install each of them and try them out, but jumping from IDE to IDE will distract you from actually jumping into the code. Just pick one or stick with Eclipse and learn it well. They're all the same once you learn the tricks of each.

A lot of people will tell you that you don't need a bloated IDE for C development, and I'm one of those people. If you were learning Java, then yup IDE no questions asked. But since you're learning C, you shouldn't even want to use an IDE, and I'd be surprised if your professor is okay with the students using one.

Here's what I think you should do, but by all means you don't have to listen to me. Pick a text editor - Sublime, Visual Studio Code, Atom, gedit, vim, emacs, whatever.

Why? Because any text editor will be a quicker than an IDE. One could argue that some of the above editors become IDEs after installing a few plugins, but who cares what you call it -- it's still quicker and lighter. You'll also be forced to compile and debug your programs via command line utilities like make, gdb, and valgrind. Why is that a good thing? Because by consistently using the command line, you'll gain a deeper understanding of C, a proficiency with Unix-like systems, and an appreciation for the art. Pressing the green play button in the IDE pretty much steals that from you.
#3. Posted:
SSID
  • Vantage
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Joined: Jun 01, 20117 Year Member
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tortuga wroteThere's a lot of options out there. If you search for "Linux IDE for whatever-language-you-want" on Google, you'll get a lot of results.

I can only recommend NetBeans and MonoDevelop as those are the only two free IDEs I've used that'll run on Linux. You can also look into the JetBrain's family of IDEs - IntelliJ for Java, CLion for C/C++, and their emerging one Rider (early build) for .NET Core. These IDEs are not free after a trial period unless you can get an educational license from them.

You could install each of them and try them out, but jumping from IDE to IDE will distract you from actually jumping into the code. Just pick one or stick with Eclipse and learn it well. They're all the same once you learn the tricks of each.

A lot of people will tell you that you don't need a bloated IDE for C development, and I'm one of those people. If you were learning Java, then yup IDE no questions asked. But since you're learning C, you shouldn't even want to use an IDE, and I'd be surprised if your professor is okay with the students using one.

Here's what I think you should do, but by all means you don't have to listen to me. Pick a text editor - Sublime, Visual Studio Code, Atom, gedit, vim, emacs, whatever. Why?

Because any text editor will be a quicker than an IDE. One could argue that some of the above editors become IDEs after installing a few plugins, but who cares what you call it -- it's still quicker and lighter. You'll also be forced to compile and debug your programs via command line utilities like make, gdb, and valgrind. Why is that a good thing? Because you'll gain a deeper understanding of C, a proficiency with Unix-like systems, and an appreciation for the art by consistently using the command line... than if you were to just press the green play button in the IDE.


Heres the thing, im still learning so entering it into the command like to test and debug gets old. the ability to just the green go button makes it so that I am able to get the program done, and still do my other homework, actual WORK. and still have time to do things I enjoy. I've seen ide's that remember assigned int's or characters and autofill by pressing enter. I'm not worried about a heavy program I have a decent desktop with an i7 6700k and a ssd so im not worried about it. He actually makes us use the ide because it gives us a better understanding of whats happening because it will tell us what values are assigned to what and everything like that. I'm willing to pay for a program too because its something that ill be doing for a while. I'm gonna give your recommended programs a try... ALSO i hate when people say google things. I come to the forums for personal opinions from people that are up to date and real. There would be no point of a forum for anything if just googling it was all people would say.. Cause i have googled it but most things i've found were out of date or on a forum for the specific ide. I just want opinions I'm thankful that you did give me an opinion however, so thanks im going to give those a try.
#4. Posted:
Cyimking
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SSID wroteIs there a better IDE and Compiler then Eclipse for C/C++/C#/Java. Most importantly C cause thats what im working with mostly now I'm Running Ubuntu, and im just looking for a compiler and IDE that make the experience more simple, and maybe with more options to auto fill things.


There's netbeans and JetBrains Products
#5. Posted:
SSID
  • Vantage
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Cyimking wrote
SSID wroteIs there a better IDE and Compiler then Eclipse for C/C++/C#/Java. Most importantly C cause thats what im working with mostly now I'm Running Ubuntu, and im just looking for a compiler and IDE that make the experience more simple, and maybe with more options to auto fill things.


There's netbeans and JetBrains Products

i got, and like jetbrains
#6. Posted:
Cyimking
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SSID wrote
Cyimking wrote
SSID wroteIs there a better IDE and Compiler then Eclipse for C/C++/C#/Java. Most importantly C cause thats what im working with mostly now I'm Running Ubuntu, and im just looking for a compiler and IDE that make the experience more simple, and maybe with more options to auto fill things.


There's netbeans and JetBrains Products

i got, and like jetbrains


If you are student then you can JetBrains products for free for a year. I haven't paid for PhpStorm in years.
#7. Posted:
SSID
  • Vantage
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Joined: Jun 01, 20117 Year Member
Posts: 620
Reputation Power: 36
Cyimking wrote
SSID wrote
Cyimking wrote
SSID wroteIs there a better IDE and Compiler then Eclipse for C/C++/C#/Java. Most importantly C cause thats what im working with mostly now I'm Running Ubuntu, and im just looking for a compiler and IDE that make the experience more simple, and maybe with more options to auto fill things.


There's netbeans and JetBrains Products

i got, and like jetbrains


If you are student then you can JetBrains products for free for a year. I haven't paid for PhpStorm in years.

Yep got it for free
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