You are viewing our Forum Archives. To view or take place in current topics click here.

Networking Question help! + repPosted:

Gavin-
  • Ninja
Status: Offline
Joined: Nov 02, 20134 Year Member
Posts: 4,251
Reputation Power: 811
#2. Posted:
speed
  • Administrator
Status: Offline
Joined: Jun 11, 20098 Year Member
Posts: 9,895
Reputation Power: 3128
Motto: "I'l no I grew up to fast speed I no u will be little famous" - Famous_Energy
So if you want a range of addresses that can be attached to the internet, it needs to meet a few criteria:

1. The IP address is valid (0-255, also cannot end in 0 or 255)
2. The IP address is not in a private/loopback/multicast/etc range.
3. The block size is valid.
(maybe something I'm missing)

So for example, 148.110.255.255/16 is not valid because the block size demands 65,536 addresses, where only one is available.

10.97.177.44/24 is not valid because it's in a private range.

203.258.221.176 is not valid because 258 is higher than 255, so it is out of range.

127.4.225.18/8 is not valid because 127 is a loopback range.

229.16.17.37/26 is not valid because it's in a multicast range.

Etc and so on. I haven't looked at the others, but you should check them on your own.

Here are some resources that will help and explain this to you.

[ Register or Signin to view external links. ]
[ Register or Signin to view external links. ]
[ Register or Signin to view external links. ]

This tool will tell you if it's valid, but should be used more for checking your work.
[ Register or Signin to view external links. ]
#3. Posted:
Gavin-
  • Ninja
Status: Offline
Joined: Nov 02, 20134 Year Member
Posts: 4,251
Reputation Power: 811
speed wroteSo if you want a range of addresses that can be attached to the internet, it needs to meet a few criteria:

1. The IP address is valid (0-255, also cannot end in 0 or 255)
2. The IP address is not in a private/loopback/multicast/etc range.
3. The block size is valid.
(maybe something I'm missing)

So for example, 148.110.255.255/16 is not valid because the block size demands 65,536 addresses, where only one is available.

10.97.177.44/24 is not valid because it's in a private range.

203.258.221.176 is not valid because 258 is higher than 255, so it is out of range.

127.4.225.18/8 is not valid because 127 is a loopback range.

229.16.17.37/26 is not valid because it's in a multicast range.

Etc and so on. I haven't looked at the others, but you should check them on your own.

Here are some resources that will help and explain this to you.

[ Register or Signin to view external links. ]
[ Register or Signin to view external links. ]
[ Register or Signin to view external links. ]

This tool will tell you if it's valid, but should be used more for checking your work.
[ Register or Signin to view external links. ]



Wow man thanks very much , our lecturer is pretty poor at explaining lol.
#4. Posted:
CriticaI
  • 2 Million
Status: Offline
Joined: Nov 05, 20134 Year Member
Posts: 2,603
Reputation Power: 148
Motto: Do What You Can't
Gavin- wrote


Wow man thanks very much , our lecturer is pretty poor at explaining lol.


I'm going through networking right now as well.
and I had the same problem.
The best thing you can do is watch lots of youtube videos on ip addressing, & subnetting
and try to find practice tests to take online.
once I figured this out, I went from a 40% to a 90%.

If you are taking this through Cisco, good **** luck.
Cisco's tests are the worst.
#5. Posted:
Gavin-
  • Ninja
Status: Offline
Joined: Nov 02, 20134 Year Member
Posts: 4,251
Reputation Power: 811
one last question for you guys ,,,


Explain how NAT has prolonged the use of IPv4 and perhaps delayed the adoption of
IPv6. Describe how NAT operates in conjunction with private addressing and use and
example to illustrate your points.
#6. Posted:
Chris
  • Moderator
Status: Offline
Joined: Nov 27, 20107 Year Member
Posts: 1,156
Reputation Power: 2251
Motto: Only you can judge your life. You have to live up to your own expectations.
Think of it as the router remembering the Mac of the private device. NAT Translates the private ip address to a public address that when packet is returned from server to the Public IP, the router recreates the packet and sends it to the private IP instead of the Public NAT IP. Without this protocol, we would have ran out of leased public IPV4 addresses a long time ago.


Take a look at this video. Let me know if you need any more information.

Jump to:
You are viewing our Forum Archives. To view or take place in current topics click here.