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looking for opinionsPosted:

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I've decided that i want to take computer science at my college but i don't meet the requirements due to my qualifications, i could take a digital media course which in somewhat linked to computer science if you do well in the two year course you can get into computer science. Only thing is the digital media isn't so much to do with computer science and its more like video editing, audio, Photoshop and i think they touch a little on Python.

I didn't stay in high school long enough to finish my math and i didn't really know what i was planning on doing in the future but i do know so i was thinking of taking math and then higher math at my college for 2 years as an alternative from digital media as from what I've been learning so far programming and computer science in general requires math or a mathematical way of thinking/problem solving so i think i would benefit more from this instead of jumping into a computer science degree with only basic math skills.

Looking for people that have or are currently doing a degree in computer science and could explain how it is taught and what i will be learning. obviously i know i will be learning how to program but from what I've read there is more to computer science than programming.

The course page doesn't go into much detail
#2. Posted:
iyop45
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If you don't want to do the digital media course, don't do it. Obviously, there is a lot of mathematics in a computer science degree and although the difficulty will vary for different universities, it will be a huge step up from "basic" maths. You should look at the universities course structure to see if it's within your reach or (more importantly) that you'll actually enjoy it.

I feel if the mathematics course will get you to where you want to be then go for it. It's not really worth taking a compromise. Though, take what I've said with a grain of salt - it's just my advice.

Why can't you email the college faculty for information regarding the course syllabus etc?
#3. Posted:
ProJimmyRustler
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So are you saying that you do not have a High school diploma, or a GED?

If you don't have either of those, then you can't even get into a college.

If I were you I would study up on your math. Do really good on your SAT or ACT so that you can skip some math classes. You will need to at least have Calculus 2 before you can even start to take some of the intermediate level programming courses.

Just because you are behind in math doesn't mean that you can't take the classes you want. You will just have to get caught up in classes.

If college is not an option for you, I would look for a technical school that will teach you programming, you can even just stick to books/Youtube videos. You can even check out Treehouse and other online subscriptions that will allow you to learn programming.
#4. Posted:
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ProJimmyRustler wroteSo are you saying that you do not have a High school diploma, or a GED?

If you don't have either of those, then you can't even get into a college.

If I were you I would study up on your math. Do really good on your SAT or ACT so that you can skip some math classes. You will need to at least have Calculus 2 before you can even start to take some of the intermediate level programming courses.

Just because you are behind in math doesn't mean that you can't take the classes you want. You will just have to get caught up in classes.

If college is not an option for you, I would look for a technical school that will teach you programming, you can even just stick to books/Youtube videos. You can even check out Treehouse and other online subscriptions that will allow you to learn programming.


The education system in the UK is different than the US so it would be difficult to explain but yes, i can get into a college. I've been studying at home for about 4 months now anyway through YouTube but i find books more informative, I got a book called "c++ from the ground up" It's all console applications but the purpose of the book is to learn the principles of programming and C++.
#5. Posted:
MGCPlays
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AxG wrote
ProJimmyRustler wroteSo are you saying that you do not have a High school diploma, or a GED?

If you don't have either of those, then you can't even get into a college.

If I were you I would study up on your math. Do really good on your SAT or ACT so that you can skip some math classes. You will need to at least have Calculus 2 before you can even start to take some of the intermediate level programming courses.

Just because you are behind in math doesn't mean that you can't take the classes you want. You will just have to get caught up in classes.

If college is not an option for you, I would look for a technical school that will teach you programming, you can even just stick to books/Youtube videos. You can even check out Treehouse and other online subscriptions that will allow you to learn programming.


The education system in the UK is different than the US so it would be difficult to explain but yes, i can get into a college. I've been studying at home for about 4 months now anyway through YouTube but i find books more informative, I got a book called "c++ from the ground up" It's all console applications but the purpose of the book is to learn the principles of programming and C++.


ask if you can have a chance thats what i did i didnt have a high enough grade in english but i asked if i could show them what i knew and how good i was and they let me on the course
#6. Posted:
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MGCPlays wrote
AxG wrote
ProJimmyRustler wroteSo are you saying that you do not have a High school diploma, or a GED?

If you don't have either of those, then you can't even get into a college.

If I were you I would study up on your math. Do really good on your SAT or ACT so that you can skip some math classes. You will need to at least have Calculus 2 before you can even start to take some of the intermediate level programming courses.

Just because you are behind in math doesn't mean that you can't take the classes you want. You will just have to get caught up in classes.

If college is not an option for you, I would look for a technical school that will teach you programming, you can even just stick to books/Youtube videos. You can even check out Treehouse and other online subscriptions that will allow you to learn programming.


The education system in the UK is different than the US so it would be difficult to explain but yes, i can get into a college. I've been studying at home for about 4 months now anyway through YouTube but i find books more informative, I got a book called "c++ from the ground up" It's all console applications but the purpose of the book is to learn the principles of programming and C++.


ask if you can have a chance thats what i did i didnt have a high enough grade in english but i asked if i could show them what i knew and how good i was and they let me on the course


Yeah that was also an option but in Scotland you need to be 18 years old before being accepted on an individual basis, I think I'll just take the Math anyway
#7. Posted:
SirLulz
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I taught myself programming while studying at high school. After finishing school, I progressed onto an apprenticeship, and my experience increased exponentially. While you may gain the degree at University, there's nothing better than practical experience, in my opinion. I've took on a multitude of problems, and each problem I've solved has improved my problem solving abilities.

If you're worried about not having the required experience for an apprenticeship, don't worry, you can learn while you work, but if you have the knowledge, it's a bonus. Gaining real world experience, and building a solid portfolio has launched my career, without the need for University.

So my recommendation is take the vocational route, but it's your choice, and yours only.
#8. Posted:
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SirLulz wroteI taught myself programming while studying at high school. After finishing school, I progressed onto an apprenticeship, and my experience increased exponentially. While you may gain the degree at University, there's nothing better than practical experience, in my opinion. I've took on a multitude of problems, and each problem I've solved has improved my problem solving abilities.

If you're worried about not having the required experience for an apprenticeship, don't worry, you can learn while you work, but if you have the knowledge, it's a bonus. Gaining real world experience, and building a solid portfolio has launched my career, without the need for University.

So my recommendation is take the vocational route, but it's your choice, and yours only.


Yeah I've been reading books at home and teaching myself, If i do a degree in computer science I'm not going to just do the work and then do nothing in my spare time and expect to be a good programmer. It's something that i actually enjoy
#9. Posted:
Cyimking
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How much math will you be taking in college? Not much really. Calc 1 - Calc 3, Linear Algebra, An engineering Stats Class, and Discrete Math.

To me, the only reason why computer science majors takes CALC is because all engineers must know Calc. Linear Algebra is mainly for people who want to go into 3D design since it deals with matrices. Stats is stats. Tbh, the only math class you will ever need is Discrete Math and that's due algorithms / proofs.

In terms of languages you will learn... it's pretty outdated to be honest. I taken 2 semesters of Java that went from the basics to classes (nothing more), then a class that taught C, C++, Scheme, and Prolog. Yea i know right? Why in the hell am paying 40k a year to learn scheme and prolog? Also, i was taught C and C++ within 2 months. Did I really fully understood C or C++? Hell no. From pointers and references... C / C++ is very confusing. Anyways, that's the languages that I was taught. In higher courses, you will end up using C++ or C for most of the classes (aka they will assign projects / homeworks and EXPECT you to be a master in that language).

Some schools are different but most will not teach you the newest languages such as web languages (PHP, Ruby, Python), C#, Scula, or any important framework for Java or C++ (spring framework for Java for example). It's suck honestly because jobs will EXPECT you know to know Java in an out but in reality you just know how to write basic code.

Now, comp sci isn't all about programming and math. You will take a data algorithm class (which is the hardest class I taken for some unknown reason), classes that deals with the hardware / lower level programming (mips), OS classes and so on.

IF I was you, I would go to a Community College to get started in Comp Sci then once you have enough credits, transfer to wherever. You can however go straight to a career if you are smart enough. Coding isn't hard but if you want to work for Google or something similar... you better know each algorithm in and out AND you better know how to code them and make changes to them to solve a problem.
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